7 Things Every Lyricist Should Know

In “Seven Things Every Lyricist Should Know,” award-winning hit songwriter Brent Baxter explains that “Realising these points has really helped me in my songwriting career to get my head right and keep it right.

If you are a lyricist, or if you also write melody but you think your strength is more lyric, this is for you.

Brilliant article for every lyricist out there. Read it 🙂


Source: Things Every Lyricist Should Know | Disc Makers Blog

Thinking of Songs as Musical Journeys

Every once in a while on social media you’ll see debates on the topic “What is music?” These are usually frustrating interactions, because no one is going to be fully satisfied with the answers they read, and maybe that’s the point of the question in the first place.

“What is music?” It’s like asking “How long is a piece of string?” but the truth is, music is different to everyone and that is the magic of it.

A song is a direct communication between songwriter and listener. It’s always good to take your listener on a journey.


Source: Thinking of Songs as Musical Journeys | The Essential Secrets of Songwriting

Switching From Major to Minor in a Song Isn’t Common, But Has a Powerful Effect

If you’re planning to write a song that contrasts major and minor keys and you want to use songs from pop music history as your guide, it’s most likely that you’ll find songs that use a minor verse and then move to a major chorus.


Source: Switching From Major to Minor in a Song Isn’t Common, But Has a Powerful Effect | The Essential Secrets of Songwriting

Mechanical royalties to rise by 32% for songwriters in the US

The mechanical royalty rate that publishers/songwriters receive for purchased music on physical discs or downloads has been 9.1 cents per track since 2006. Now, the settlement proposes a 32% increase to 12 cents per track.

Furthermore, songwriter royalties will automatically increase annually – relative to the rate of inflation.

It’s about time…


Source: Mechanical royalties to rise by 32% for songwriters in the US – RouteNote Blog

Here’s How to Enhance Your Songwriting Process in 5 Steps

Whether you’re new to writing songs, or have been at it for a long while, there is always an opportunity to optimize your process.

To figure this out, it helps to identify what your particular songwriting process is currently, and what you need to do to enhance it.

This is great little article outlining 5 simple and straight-forward ways to enhance your songwriting process.


Source: Here’s How to Enhance Your Songwriting Process in 5 Steps – Soundfly

Here’s Just The Bass On The Entire Beatles Abbey Road Album

It’s fun to listen to The Beatles Abbey Road album, but even more fun to listen to Paul’s isolated bass tracks for every song.

Again, this just vindicates how much of a bass playing genius Sir Paul McCartney is. Trust me, this is worth a listen.


Source: Here’s Just The Bass On The Entire Beatles Abbey Road Album – Bobby Owsinski’s Music Production Blog

How active listening will make you a better songwriter

How can you accomplish this? Through active listening – a process of deciphering what you hear, learning from it, and incorporating that technique into your own songwriting style in order to achieve a similar effect.

I’ve always believed that active listening whether it be for musical ideas or lyrical ideas is one of the necessary skills a songwriter must have to further their craft.


Source: How active listening will make you a better songwriter | Bandzoogle Blog

The Writing Better Songs Checklist

Here are some ways to judge whether you are writing “better” commercial songs. No one of these measures alone determines “writing better,” but putting all of them together gives you a pretty good sense of your progress:

There are 7 points in this “better songwriting checklist” and all of them ask pertinent questions about your songwriting process. Well worth a read.


Source: The Writing Better Songs Checklist – SongTown on Songwriting

Being Your Own Best Critic

If you’re like most songwriters out there, you’re probably dealing a lot with your “inner critic.” That term simply refers to your tendency to be your own toughest judge.

So how do you assess your songs without also feeling negative or defeated even before you’ve got your song written?

This is a very well written and straight to the point article on how your inner critic can become your best friend.


Source: Being Your Own Best Critic | The Essential Secrets of Songwriting